Presentations

The idea of doing a presentation is that you demonstrate you can

This is something you will have to do frequently in your future jobs, be it as a researcher, an educator or anything else at an academic level.

I have selected a number of recent J. Am. Chem. Soc. communications in the general area of (applied) organometallic chemistry. Everyone should present one of these. A presentation would typically be about 15-20 minutes, excluding question time (but if you can do it in five minutes, that is fine too!). Your fellow students can (should, actually) ask questions both during and after the presentation. If they ask something you are going to cover later on, just say so.

A J. Am. Chem. Soc. communication typically starts with an extensive introduction as to why an area is important, then presents new findings in this area, and finally explains how these contribute towards solving the problems mentioned in the introduction, and the well-being of mankind in general. For your presentation, I am asking you to use a slightly unusual order: first explain the new results, and then put them in context. This makes it easier to concentrate on the science rather then on the sales part of the paper. However sales is important too, so don't forget to cover the "why" part!

Finally (and this is the most difficult part), I want you to try to evaluate the paper. Is it truly earth-shattering, is it a trivial but well-"sold" finding, does it present a new and surprising way of looking at existing chemistry, etc. Give your own, honest opinion. There is no "right" and "wrong" here!

Please note there is a reason for each of these papers to appear in JACS. JACS is a high-ranking journal presenting chemistry potentially of interest to a broad range of readers. So (a) there is probably unusual chemistry in there, only partly covered by the Organometallics course, and (b) several people (at least the authors and two reviewers) believe the paper is important and correct. JACS papers typically have a high information density, so you might need to read them several times. However, since they have been written for a broad audience they should not require too much background knowledge.

Paulo Moreira March 30 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 9888
Jan Pen March 30 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 10350
    J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 10824
    J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 11318
Kenneth Lin March 30 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 12534
Mohamad Omar April 1 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 13210
Catherine Kwong April 6 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 13912
    J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14142
Kelly Enns April 1 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14168
Yiming Guan April 6 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 15974
Guanzhong Bai April 6 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 16354
Stan Giesbrecht April 1 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17552
     
Peter Budzelaar March 18 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 17674