Social & Personality Psychology
       
 

Area Faculty

 


  Dan Bailis

Dr. Daniel S. Bailis, Associate Professor
Ph.D., Princeton University
Phone: (204) 474-7326
Email: bailisds@cc.umanitoba.ca
Website: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~bailisds

   
 

How does goal conflict affect the pursuit of physical activity and other personal health-improvement goals?
My interests are in the area of social psychology and health. I am currently investigating goal conflict as a barrier to regular physical activity, and the psychological processes involved, including the loss of enjoyment or intrinsic motivation from exercise, conditioning of negative emotions to exercise objects and settings, weakening of psychological structures underlying the intention to exercise, and justifying ongoing underperformance of personal exercise goals. I have also worked in the area of healthy aging and have a long-term interest in adaptive traits and processes such as perceived control, collective self-esteem, and social comparison.

   
  Jessica Cameron

Dr. Jessica J. Cameron, Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Waterloo
Phone: (204) 474-7490
Email: cameron2@ms.umanitoba.ca
Website: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~cameron2/

   
  How does personality influence relationships?
My primary interest is how personality influences relationships and how relationships, in turn,
influence personality. My current research addresses how insecurity and social goals influence interpersonal perception and communication and of course, perceptions of communication (metaperceptions or signal amplification bias). With my interest in both personality and social contexts, most of my research takes a Person x Situation interactionist perspective. I have also taken a special interest in the measurement of insecurity, especially the models of self and other.
   
  Dr. Beverley Fehr, Adjunct Professor (University of WInnipeg)
Ph. D., University of British Columbia
Phone: (204) 786-9864
Email: b.fehr@uwinnipeg.ca
   
 

My research is mainly on people’s conceptions of relationship concepts (e.g., love, intimacy, commitment, anger) as well as on the experience of love, intimacy, and the like in ongoing relationships. Currently, I am conducting research on conceptions and the experience of four fundamental kinds of love (romantic/passionate love, companionate love, attachment love, and compassionate love) in dating and marital relationships. In another line of research, I am conducting studies on conceptions and the experience of intimacy in same-sex friendships, with a focus on gender differences. The ultimate goal is to understand what makes for a satisfying relationship and how to promote relational well-being.       

 

 

  Marian Morry

Dr. Marian M. Morry, Professor
Ph.D., University of Iowa
Phone: (204) 474-7840
Email: Marian_Morry@Umanitoba.ca
Website: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~morrym/

   
 

My research interests involve attachment styles, self-esteem, and the quality of one's close relationships; both friendships and romantic relationships. More specifically, I currently examine how individuals with (a) anxious or avoidant attachment styles or (b) high or low self-esteem differ in their reactions to social comparisons of their dating relationships. I am also interested in more general social cognitions within one's dating relationship where the individual enhances the partner relative to the self and to the general other. For more details on my research, please go to the current studies page.

 

 

  Raymond Perry

Dr. Raymond P. Perry, Professor
Ph.D., University of Calgary
Phone: (204) 474-7838
Email: rperry@cc.umanitoba.ca
Website: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~maach/perryhome.html

   
  My research interests lie primarily within the social cognition domain, as exemplified by Weiner's Attribution Theory, Covington's Self-Worth Theory, Seligman's Learned Helplessness Theory, etc. Within this general orientation, three major topics have been emphasized. One line of research has focused on motivation and performance in achievement settings. Of particular interest is the identification of academic markers that make some people failure-prone and others mastery-oriented. Related to this is the development of intervention techniques designed to assist high-risk individuals to function at optimal capacity. A second line of research has examined the role of perceived personal control in health and aging in diverse populations. Utilizing a variety of control theory perspectives, it is assumed that perceived control has a strong, positive influence on health and successful aging. Finally, some research has focused on the analysis of prejudice and discrimination in different social settings.
 

 

  Raymond Perry

Dr. Katherine B. Starzyk, Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Queen's University
Phone: (204) 474-8254
Email: starzyk@cc.umanitoba.ca
Website: http://www.katherinestarzyk.com

   
 

Falling under the umbrella of “social justice” research, my goal is to understand when people are likely to become concerned about current or past human rights issues as well as how various “frames” of such issues affect intergroup relations. I aim to make both theoretical and applied contributions. Currently, I am working on three interrelated projects. First, funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Standard Research Grant, my students and I are investigating what affects people’s responses to reparations for major intergroup harms. Second, as a co-investigator on a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (Principal Investigator Karen Busby, Law), I am investigating how First Nations might most effectively advocate for clean, running water – about 39% of water and 14% of wastewater systems on First Nations have major deficiencies (see http://chrr.info/index.php/water-rights for more information). Third, as a co-investigator on another SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (Principal Investigator Andrew Woolford, Sociology), in the next three years my lab will investigate whether and how a virtual Indian Residential School affects people’s attitudes and feelings about Indian Residential School survivors (see http://embodyingempathy.ca for more information). Though the above are certainly my focus, I also have an interest in personality, person perception, and psychometrics.

 

 

  Jacquie Vorauer

Dr. Jacquie D. Vorauer, Professor
Ph.D., University of Waterloo
Phone: (204) 474-8250
Email: vorauer@cc.umanitoba.ca
Website: http://www.umanitoba.ca/cgi-bin/psychology/hpg_main.cgi?data/vorauer.txt

   
 

How can the quality of intergroup interaction be improved?
My research interests center on "metaperceptions," people's beliefs about the traits, thoughts, and feelings that they have conveyed to others. I focus in particular on examining communication breakdowns that pose obstacles to positive relationships between individuals and groups in society, with the long term goal of identifying ways in which these obstacles can be overcome. One line of investigation centers on misunderstandings that occur in risky interpersonal situations, such as efforts to initiate new romantic relationships or friendships across group boundaries. An additional line of research focuses on how evaluative concerns affect people's interactions with out-group members.

 
 

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